Pork Fried Cauliflower Rice

Pork Fried Cauliflower Rice

Pork Fried Cauliflower RiceHello folks! I’ve been super busy between working at Bob’s Red Mill (check me out on the blog), helping with GeekCraft Expo, and my other work with Pairings Portland and others. But I made a delicious pork fried cauliflower rice tonight and wanted to jot down the recipe before I forgot it!

I didn’t create this because I’m especially low carb–I just actually love cauliflower and like it better than rice. But it is lower in calories: I entered this recipe into MyFitnessPal (I’m obsessed) and a serving is about 200 calories (that’s four rather restrained servings, split this in two if you prefer).  Anyway, I knew I had a head of cauliflower and half a pound of leftover roasted pork languishing in my fridge, so I adapted this recipe for regular pork fried rice and came up with this:

Pork Fried Cauliflower Rice

You need:

1 head cauliflower
1 shallot
1 tsp vegetable oil
1/2 lb roasted pork tenderloin, cut into bite-sized pieces
1 medium carrot, cut into dice
1/2 cup peas, fresh or frozen
2 green onions, chopped
2 eggs, beaten
2 Tbsp soy sauce
1/4 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp garlic powder

Core and grate the cauliflower, preferably in a food processor (mine came with two grating discs, I use the one with the larger holes). Then throw in the shallot and grate it as well.

In a large frying pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the cauliflower and shallot and saute, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown. Then push it all to one side and add the pork, carrot, peas (I threw them in frozen), and green onions. Let cook for about five minutes, stirring occasionally, and then mix it all together and push it to one side again.

Add the beaten egg, stirring occasionally, until the egg is scrambled. Stir the egg into the rice and add the soy sauce, ground ginger, and garlic powder. Eat!

Makes 4 servings, or 2 big servings

Does anyone have a killer cauliflower rice recipe to share? Wanna be friend in MyFitnessPal? Post below!

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turkey enchiladas

Thanksgiving Recovery

turkey enchiladas

Image via Epicurious. Get. In. My. Belly!

Whew! And how was your Thanksgiving? Mine was wonderful and exhausting, but this morning, I was confronted with the reality that it was not over: I still had a turkey carcass in my fridge that had to be dealt with. So I put on a YouTube playlist (The Daily Connoisseur gets me motivated), pushed up my sleeves, and got to work, carving off and saving the extra meat and tearing apart the bird so I could make two pots of broth (we had a 20-pound turkey this year–huge!). As I worked I had the following random thoughts, which you might appreciate:

  • Next year I need to look for the baggie of giblets a little harder. My Dad discovered it (fully cooked, in paper) while he carved the turkey. Whoops.
  • I feel like I did not sell my Fresh Herb Stuffing recipe as well as I could have (seeing that I hadn’t eaten it in a year when I typed it out). Frankly: it is gooooooood. So good! So simple, so the fresh herbs take center stage. And the texture from the artisan bread was perfect: soft yet substantial, with toasty edges. Oh, I want more. My friend Mary-Suzanne used my recipe and added some dried cherries, which sounds fantastic.
  • Finally, after 41 years, I am over canned cranberry sauce. It’s too sweet. So I need a good whole-berry recipe–anyone want to share?

Okay, fess up–do you have a bird in your fridge right now? Don’t let it go to waste! I had to toss some leftover pie this morning and was very sad. Here are my plans to put our turkey to good use:

  • Turkey broth: I follow the guidelines for my chicken broth recipe, but I usually divide the bird between two pots and make double.
  • Mexican Turkey Soup: I use the recipe from Soup Makes the Meal, by Ken Haedrich, but this recipe from the New York Times looks lovely.
  • Turkey Enchiladas: This was a suggestion from a friend on Facebook–I love enchiladas, and I like to avoid traditional Thanksgiving flavors when I use up my turkey leftovers (see soup above)–it makes them more interesting.
  • Paleo Turkey Tetrazzini: I am not paleo, but my friend Melissa is, and she is fantastic at choosing recipes, so I’m excited to try this. My husband loves spaghetti squash and will be excited to eat more vegetables.

What are your Thanksgiving recovery plans? Do you have a whole-berry cranberry sauce recipe to share? Post below!

Green Beans With Filberts, Fennel & Orange

Thanksgiving! It’s less than a week away. I never worry about my menu, because guess what: my family likes to eat the same dishes every year, no matter what. Sure, I might try a new stuffing recipe or add a new appetizer, but if I take out the green bean casserole? It’s over. But I can usually add a new vegetable dish, and this year, it’s Green Beans with Filberts, Fennel, and Orange.

My friend Sara Proctor adapted this from a very different Ottolenghi recipe. It’s zesty and fresh and tart–the perfect thing to cut through the richness of mashed potatoes and gravy. Plus it’s delicious at room temperature!

Green Beans with Filberts, Fennel & Orange

1 fennel bulb, stems removed and thinly sliced, then quick pickled (see below)
2 cups green beans, stems removed and cut in half
1 small blood orange, zested and juiced
2 Tablespoons sesame oil (olive or any nut oil will work)
3/4 cup filberts, roasted (see below)
2 Tablespoons chopped chives
Lemon juice to taste
Salt and pepper to taste

Quick-Pickled Fennel:

3/4 cup rice vinegar
3/4 cup water
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon peppercorns

Bring all ingredients to a boil, then allow to cool. Pour over fennel and let sit for at least 20 minutes.

Roasted Filberts:

Heat oven to 350 degrees.  In an oven-proof dish, place filberts on the middle rack and roast for approximately 15 minutes, checking and shaking every few minutes. Once roasted, place in a clean kitchen towel and rub to remove skins. Roughly chop.

Main Recipe:

Blanch green beans in boiling water for 4 minutes, then shock in ice-cold water. Drain and towel dry. Place in a medium bowl and add chives, orange zest and chopped fennel. Mix.

In a small bowl, mix orange juice, sesame oil, salt and pepper, and a few squirts of lemon juice. Pour over green bean mixture.

Add filberts, toss, and serve.

Fresh Herb Stuffing With Artisan Bread

Episode # 12440

I didn’t have a picture so I included one of General Hospital‘s Quartermaine family, who always have comically horrible Thanksgivings. The pizza will arrive shortly.

Like most of you, I love stuffing at Thanksgiving–it’s all the more special because now that I think of it, Thanksgiving is the only time I eat stuffing (note to self: make stuffing more often). This simple-yet-delicious Fresh Herb Stuffing recipe originally appeared in the Oregonian, probably in 2005 or 2006. Googling does me no good, so I’m glad my Mom and I saved it!

After years of more complicated recipes, I was surprised by how much I liked this one. The fresh herbs really make it delicious, and it complements, rather than competes with, your other dishes. However, there are several jazzier variations included below!

Fresh Herb Stuffing

Makes 8 servings

You Need:

1 1-lb. loaf firm-textured artisan white or sourdough bread (Note: if you live in Portland, Grand Central’s Piccolo Como is perfect)
1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened (divided)
1 yellow onion, diced 1/4 inch
2 stalks celery, diced 1/4 inch
1/2 cup packed finely chopped fresh parsley
2 Tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
2 teaspoons chopped fresh savory or marjoram
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 cups chicken stock
2 eggs

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Tear the bread, including crusts, into small bite-size pieces, about the size of walnut halves. Place them on an ungreased baking sheet in a single layer and toast in the oven for 15 to 18 minutes, turning once, until crisp but not browned. You will have about 10 cups. Set aside to cool.

Use 1 tablespoon of the butter to grease a wide 10- to 12-cup baking dish. Melt 1/2 cup of butter (1 stick) in a sauté pan over medium heat. When it foams, add the onion and celery and cook for 8 minutes until vegetables have softened. Scrape all the butter and vegetables into a large mixing bowl and let cool for 10 minutes.

Add the toasted bread to the mixing bowl, along with the parsley, sage, thyme, savory or marjoram, salt and pepper. Toss to combine all the ingredients and coat the bread with the melted butter. Pour in 2 cups of the stock (it should be cool) and stir. Beat the 2 eggs into the remaining 1 cup stock and stir into the stuffing just enough to blend without over-mixing. Spoon the stuffing into the baking dish without packing it down. Dot it with the remaining tablespoon of butter and cover the baking dish with aluminum foil. Refrigerate overnight or until ready to bake.

To bake, place the covered stuffing into an oven set at anywhere between 350 to 425 degrees; bake for 30 minutes. Remove the foil and continue baking until stuffing crowns in the center and the top browns, 30 to 45 minutes more.

Sausage variation: Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add 8 ounces pork sausage and cook, stirring to break it up, just until it changes color but does not brown. Strain out the sausage and reserve, leaving the fats (no more than 1/4 cup) in the pan. Add only 1/4 cup more butter to the hot pan to cook the onions and celery. Reduce the salt to 3/4 teaspoon. Mix the reserved sausage into the stuffing with the herbs.

Mushroom variation: Roughly chop 1 pound cleaned fresh mushrooms, such as cremini, white button or portobello, and cook with the onions and celery until softened.

Chestnut variation: Roughly chop 1 cup fresh roasted and shelled, or canned, but unsweetened chestnuts. Mix them into the stuffing with the herbs.

Oyster variation: Drain 1 pint fresh, shucked oysters. Measure the liquor from the oysters and use it to replace an equal amount of the chicken stock for the stuffing. Gently mix the whole oysters into the stuffing with the herbs.

Bacon variation: Slice 4 ounces bacon strips into 1/2-inch pieces. Cook in a skillet over medium-low heat until all the fat is rendered but the bacon is not browned. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon and reserve, leaving the fat in the pan. Add only 1/4 cup of the butter to the hot pan to cook the onions and celery. Reduce the salt to 3/4 teaspoon. If desired, mix the reserved bacon into the stuffing with the herbs.

Apple variation: Peel, core and cut 4 apples, such as Gala, Rome or Granny Smith, into 1/2-inch dice. Cook them with the onions and celery until softened.

Are you all set for Thanksgiving? I’ll be posting this year’s menu shortly!

Tuna Noodle Casserole

Yes You Can: Make a Luscious Tuna Noodle Casserole

Tuna Noodle Casserole

Luscious Tuna Noodle Casserole, a Gould family recipe!

The cold and rain have returned to Portland, which means it’s soup and casserole weather, yay! I love a good casserole–they’re typically easy to make and feed a crowd. And oh I love to pull out the Campbell’s Cream of soups. They just feel cozy. This tuna noodle casserole comes from my friend Tiffany Gould, who graciously shared her family recipe with us, and it is fantastic: rich, creamy, and satisfying. It’s also huge.

Plus, like any good casserole, it’s flexible, allowing for the addition of whatever’s in your fridge. For instance, I made the casserole pictured above with egg noodles (instead of extra-large macaroni), ricotta (instead of sour cream), and thyme (in place of parsley), and it still retained its ineffably delicious character. Make it tonight!

Tuna Noodle Casserole

Serves 12

You Need:
2 cans white albacore tuna, drained
12 oz. extra-large macaroni, cooked and drained (if you use egg noodles, use 1 lb)
1 can cream of chicken soup
1 can cream of mushroom soup
1 cup sour cream
Pepper (to taste)
Parsley (to taste)
Milk
3 cups grated cheddar cheese
Breadcrumbs

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cook noodles in large pot according to directions on package and grate cheese. When noodles are done, drain and set aside. Combine tuna (you may need to chunk it up a bit), cream of chicken soup, and cream of mushroom soup in the pot used to boil noodles. Then add sour cream, pepper and parsley to taste; the measurements above are just an estimate, not exact.

Next, stir in the noodles and 2/3 of the grated cheese. Add milk until the mixture stirs easily; keep in mind the casserole will lose moisture as it cooks. Pour into a 9″ x 13″ pan, cover with the remainder of the grated cheese, and sprinkle breadcrumbs on the top.

Cover pan with foil and place in oven. Cook at 350 degrees for 15 minutes, and then check to see if the cheese has melted and the casserole is bubbling. If so, remove foil and cook for about another 15 minutes, until cheese on top has golden brown spots.

Variations: Add in leftovers from the refrigerator that need to be used in place of the milk, sour cream or cheese (cream cheese, buttermilk, cream, alfredo sauce, cottage cheese, ranch dressing). Parmesan cheese sprinkled on top with the bread crumbs tastes great, too.

Big thanks to Tiffany Gould and her family for bringing this recipe into our lives! Do you have a go-to casserole recipe? Post it below!

Circle of Chicken: Sid’s Soup

white bean chili

Sid’s Soup with corn muffin accompaniment!

Longtime readers will remember my Circle of Chicken posts–you start by making a perfect roast chicken and then use the leftovers to create hash, soup, broth, etc. I love the Circle of Chicken because you can make so many recipes from one $5 chicken (if you shop the sales), and I love having homemade broth on hand. Now I’m sharing one of my family’s favorite recipes: Sid’s Soup, named after my son (who loves it so).

Our good friend Amy made it for a party, and once I noticed Sid scarfing it down, I asked for the recipe. I was directed to Sunday Soup by Betty Rosbottom, but quickly realized that this soup was heavily adapted from a recipe for Spicy Pork Chili with Cumin Polenta. “Adapted” as in Amy’s soup didn’t have pork or polenta.

After some texting back and forth, I got the real deal, which is posted below. It’s incredibly flavorful and zesty–each bite wakes up your tongue, since it has a very mild edge of heat from the pepper and tartness from the lime juice. Swap out the chicken broth for vegetable broth to make it vegan!

Sid’s Soup

Serves 6

You Need:

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1 cup diced carrots
1 serrano pepper, seeds and membranes removed, minced
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 1/2 cups dry white beans, soaked overnight and simmered until tender, or two 15-oz cans
1 28-oz can chopped tomatoes
2 tablespoons lime juice
4 cups chicken broth
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro
Salt and pepper

Heat the vegetable oil over medium heat and add the onions, carrots, and chili powder. Stir occasionally and cook until slightly browned, 5-10 minutes. Add the serrano peppers and garlic and cook, stirring, for another minute. Then add the beans, tomatoes lime juice, and chicken broth. Bring to a boil and the reduce heat. Simmer for at least one hour with the lid partially open.

Taste the soup and add salt and pepper as needed. Stir in the cilantro and serve (preferably with corn muffins).

Big thanks to Amy Baker for sharing her recipe! Now that it’s getting chilly (at least in Oregon), who out there is making soup? What kind?

Happy Monday! Oh My God That Baby

img_0224Happy Monday! On a Monday! What the what? I’m sure you’re tired of hearing this, but the last two weeks have been totally nuts. Here’s a brief rundown of what I’ve been up to:

GeekCraft Expo Seattle has been announced for December 10 and 11 at the Seattle Center (Facebook event)! This is very exciting for me, because GeekCraft Expo PDX was so successful and so fun. It’s also pretty nerve wracking, because I don’t know Seattle as well as I do Portland, so I’m feeling the pressure to get the word out. So far the response from exhibitors has been fantastic . . . I just don’t want to get overconfident.

The Doubleclicks are part of the Portland Mercury‘s The Undisputable Geniuses Of Comedy show September 16–and then embark on a California tour with Lucia Fasano, with stops in Santa Clara, Oakland, Burbank, and West Hollywood. Then, get ready for the Lucia Fasano CD Release Party with The Doubleclicks & More October 15 at Books with Pictures!

You can hear The Doubleclicks and Lucia Fasano on Geek in the City, a delightful podcast hosted by Aaron Duran.

Whew! Then, it was Rose City Comic Con this weekend, which means we had a ton of comics creators and other friends pouring into town. It was dinner party city here, which was a lot of fun for me, but so much work. Here are the recipes I used:

Dinner Party #1: We had Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá over, with Diana Schutz and Bob Schreck.

I was super prepared for this dinner party, so everything went smoothly. Everyone even wanted coffee with dessert, so I could feel like a real-life grownup and use the little coffee cups and saucers that came with my wedding china. Yes!

Dinner Party #2: Team Hellboy

Whenever I feed Mike Mignola, I have this crazy urge to serve him tentacles, which is what brought me to paella. Although this recipe didn’t include squid, so–ah well. This menu was also great because one of our guests is gluten free. I wasn’t quite as well prepared for this dinner, because I clogged our sink with potato skins (never again! I promise!) so my husband had to take everything out of the cabinet and work under there for half an hour to save my irresponsible self.

Rose City went well. I always have a small freakout before dealing with the public, even when (and sometimes especially when) it’s packed with people I know, or at least know of. But I talked to all the crafters, caught up with some pals, and even scored a Jay & Miles X-Plain the X-Men t-shirt.

But Elisabeth, you’re probably wondering, what’s with the “That Baby” title? What’s with the picture at the top of this post?

The other thing keeping me so busy is my about-to-turn-two bundle of snuggles and destruction, Sarah. She got hold of a red Sharpie (damn you Scott Allie and your editor’s trove of red pens!) and covered our couch in permanent ink in less than two minutes. Like, I was cooking, I realized she had gone very quiet, I went into the parlor, and . . . oh my god. This was the day of the Hellboy party, so I had to quickly turn the cushions over and give myself a hard mental shake. Fortunately, it’s an 11-year-old couch, and I had already scheduled a cleaning for it the next day (didn’t help the Sharpie, but the rest looks 100% better), but . . . still! I may try rubbing alcohol and see what I can do.

Whew! I got tired just typing this, so maybe I need iron or something. How was your week? Any magical Sharpie-removal tips to share? Help!